Payments and Statements

Saturday, May 20, 9-10.15 am

Moderator: Dan-el Padilla Peralta

Rose MacLean, “Pro libertate dedit: representing the costs of freedom in Roman Italy”
Kirsten Schultz, “Fraud, Value and Labor in the golden age taxing gold and taxing slaves in eighteenth-century Brazil”
Fritz Calixte, “American and Haitian independencies and the misunderstanding of freedom”

Rose MacLean, “Pro libertate dedit: representing the costs of freedom in Roman Italy”

Rose MacLean is an Assistant Professor of Classics Undergraduate Advisor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research focuses on the cultural history of the Roman Empire, especially as it reflects interactions between the ruling elite and groups at the social and political margins. Her first book, Freed Slaves and Roman Imperial Culture, is under contract with Cambridge University Press. Drawing on a range of literary and material evidence, the study examines the dialogue between the Roman aristocracy and former slaves whom, she argues, made an active contribution to the development of elite culture under the Principate.


Kirsten Schultz, “Fraud, Value and Labor in the golden age taxing gold and taxing slaves in eighteenth-century Brazil”

Kirsten Schultz is a historian of Brazil and the Portuguese Empire who received her M.A. and Ph.D. from New York University and her B.A. from UC Berkeley. Her first book, Tropical Versailles: Empire, Monarchy and the Portuguese Royal Court in Rio de Janeiro, 1808-1821 (Routledge: 2001/Portuguese translation 2008), examined ideas of empire, legitimacy, and the problem of slavery in early nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro. Her current book-length project, from which the paper proposal is derived, examines transformations in understandings of authority, society, and culture in the eighteenth-century Portuguese empire in America, focusing on debates about the status of people of African, indigenous, and mixed descent in the context of colonial governance. Her research has been funded by the American Council of Learned Societies (2011) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (2010).


Fritz Calixte, “American and Haitian independencies and the misunderstanding of freedom”

Professor Calixe Fritz will be presenting how the first two independencies of the New World were realized in the name of the freedom of the moderns but covered two almost antithetical meanings of the same word. Haiti, in addition, shares this misunderstanding of freedom with the French Revolution. For this former colony of the Caribbean takes again the concept of freedom, developed by the philosophers of the Enlightenment to extend it, beyond what was thought in Europe. The extension of the concept beyond the European-centered world will not be without consequences already on the project of Modernity and will constitute a true line of fracture between the former slaves of Saint-Domingue and the American and French revolutions. This communication will resume the misunderstanding of freedom and will try to shed light on the two meanings that take place in American and Haitian independencies. It will explain how the debt of independence imposed to Haiti is an additional attempt to obstruct the notion of freedom as it was appropriated by the slaves of Saint-Domingue and who saw it as a freedom for all men without distinction.